[CEATEC] How Did Toshiba Realize World's Slimmest, Lightest Notebook PC?

Oct 12, 2011
Tsunenori Tomioka, Nikkei Monozukuri
The "dynabook R631" is the world's slimmest, lightest 13.3-inch notebook computer.
The "dynabook R631" is the world's slimmest, lightest 13.3-inch notebook computer.
[Click to enlarge image]
A see-through model of the dynabook R631
A see-through model of the dynabook R631
[Click to enlarge image]
A disassembled model of the notebook
A disassembled model of the notebook
[Click to enlarge image]

Toshiba Corp showcased the "dynabook R631," the world's slimmest, lightest 13.3-inch notebook computer, at CEATEC Japan 2011, which took place from Oct 4 to 8, 2011, in Chiba Prefecture, Japan.

The company also exhibited see-through and disassembled models to introduce its technologies used for reducing the thickness and weight of the notebook.

The thickness of the dynabook R631 (excluding protrusions) is 15.9mm, and its mass is about 1.12kg. The slimness and light weight were realized by using techniques to mount components in a high density and improve the robustness of a thin chassis.

The display part of the notebook is about 4.5mm thick. And the other part (on the side the keyboard) has a 11mm-thick space for components to be mounted. Because it was difficult to place a printed circuit board (PCB) over or below a lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery, Toshiba placed a PCB under the keyboard and a Li-ion battery using prismatic cells, which contribute to reducing thickness, under the palm rest.

The capacity of the battery is 47Wh though it is lower than that of the company's notebook PC with a long battery life (67Wh). To reduce the size of the PCB and place it in a limited space, Toshiba mounted components in a high density by arranging small, low-height components on the both sides of the PCB.

To reduce the thickness of a notebook PC, it is necessary to improve resistance to twist. For example, some users hold a notebook PC by gripping a front corner of its lower chassis (on the side of the keyboard) when the display is in its upright position. In such a case, a torsional stress is applied to a diagonal line of the chassis.

(Continue to the next page)