[Breaking Down OLED TV] We Watched Digital Terrestrial Broadcast [Part 3]

Nov 29, 2007
Nikkei Electronics Breakdown Team
We turned on the OLED TV. We could see the high contrast ratio even on the settings screen.
We turned on the OLED TV. We could see the high contrast ratio even on the settings screen.
[Click to enlarge image]
The rod antenna of the OLED TV for receiving digital terrestrial broadcasts: It is nearly the same size as a mobile phone antenna.
The rod antenna of the OLED TV for receiving digital terrestrial broadcasts: It is nearly the same size as a mobile phone antenna.
[Click to enlarge image]
Instead of the digital terrestrial broadcasting, the OLED display panel indicated an alert saying "low signal level."
Instead of the digital terrestrial broadcasting, the OLED display panel indicated an alert saying "low signal level."
[Click to enlarge image]
A high contrast image of the total solar eclipse displayed on the screen
A high contrast image of the total solar eclipse displayed on the screen
[Click to enlarge image]

We opened the box of Sony's XEL-1 OLED TV and turned it on. We started to adjust the settings for digital terrestrial broadcasting on the configuration screen that appeared.

We could only connect the TV to an antenna outlet at a certain spot in the Nikkei Electronics editorial department. Then, we remembered that XEL-1 included a rod antenna for receiving digital terrestrial broadcasts. We started to adjust the reception settings for the antenna.

After entering regional information, etc, we were soon finished with the settings. Unexpectedly, the TV would not display the broadcast that it should have. While we were wondering whether the signal was too weak, one of us realized that we forgot to insert the B-CAS card, which is required to receive digital terrestrial broadcasts.

Soon after inserting the card, the broadcast was displayed without any trouble. We tuned to a digital broadcast and watched a high contrast image of a total solar eclipse. We could see vivid images on the XEL-1, which has a high contrast ratio of 1,000,000:1 and a color gamut of 110% NTSC.

Compared with LCD and PDP TVs, the red (R) and green (G) hues looked more saturated and the images seemed too vivid. This may be caused by the image processing method employed by this TV.

We finished adjusting the settings for digital terrestrial broadcasting. At last, we were ready to begin breaking down the TV, which is the main subject of this article. ...