[FPD International] Numerous LCD TV Panels Thinner Than 20mm, With CCFL or White LED Backlight

Oct 26, 2007
Takuya Otani, Nikkei Electronics
The model presented by Samsung Electronics
The model presented by Samsung Electronics
[Click to enlarge image]
The model presented by CPT
The model presented by CPT
[Click to enlarge image]
The model presented by LG.Philips LCD
The model presented by LG.Philips LCD
[Click to enlarge image]
The model presented by AUO
The model presented by AUO
[Click to enlarge image]

TV LCD panel modules with the thickness of less than 20mm are disclosed one after another at the FPD International 2007.

Examples:
- 10 mm panel (40 inch, 1920 × 1080 resolution) by Samsung Electronics Co Ltd of Korea
- 14mm panel (32 inch, 1366 × 768 resolution) by Chunghwa Picture Tubes Ltd (CPT) of Taiwan
- 19.8mm panel (42 inch, 1920 × 1080 resolution) by LG.Philips LCD Co Ltd of Korea
- 20mm panel (32 inch, 1366 × 768 resolution) by AU Optronics Corp of Taiwan

In every panel module mentioned above, the thickness was reduced by reduction of backlight thickness. The backlight is selected from the two major types, the conventional CCFL (cold cathode fluorescent lamp) and the LED.

Currently, CCFL is more practical because it is cost-effective and has higher luminance efficiency. Among the aforementioned four companies, LG.Philips LCD and AUO realized thinner panels by adopting CCFL backlight.

"We developed a thinner panel using CCFL because it is more cost effective," according to AUO. The two companies plan to commercialize their products in the near future. LG.Philips LCD says, "We will start the volume production in the near future," while AUO plans to start volume production in the second quarter of 2008. Both of them are equipped with a direct-type backlight.

Samsung Electronics and CPY adopted LED for reduction of thickness. Their products are thinner than those of the two companies that adopted CCFL. Samsung Electronics and CPY used a white LED in an edge light structure. Samsung Electronics says, "We are planning to start mass production in 2008." CPT says the timeline for mass production has yet to be decided.