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Integrated Monitoring System Employed for 10MW Solar Plant (page 3)

High-speed, large-volume data processing at a low cost using building management system

2014/06/09 13:07
Shinichi Kato, Nikkei BP CleanTech Institute
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Fig. 1: Approx 10MW-output mega-solar "Ako Solar Power Plant" built in an industrial park on the former salt farm. The beautiful sight of neatly arrayed solar panels. (source: upper by Shimizu, lower by Nikkei BP)
Fig. 1: Approx 10MW-output mega-solar "Ako Solar Power Plant" built in an industrial park on the former salt farm. The beautiful sight of neatly arrayed solar panels. (source: upper by Shimizu, lower by Nikkei BP)

Fig. 2: The state of power generation by each string being displayed in different colors that grow redder as it approaches full output so anybody can immediately recognize the situation. Display examples on April 8, 2014. The upper left is around 7:45, the upper right is around 10:50 when the output was full, the lower left is around 14:20 when the output started to fall and the lower right is around 17:30 when power generation is almost over. (source: Shimizu)
Fig. 2: The state of power generation by each string being displayed in different colors that grow redder as it approaches full output so anybody can immediately recognize the situation. Display examples on April 8, 2014. The upper left is around 7:45, the upper right is around 10:50 when the output was full, the lower left is around 14:20 when the output started to fall and the lower right is around 17:30 when power generation is almost over. (source: Shimizu)

Fig. 3: The concrete foundations were efficiently made using metal molds. The size was expanded to boost load resistance in the outer rows, where wind pressure is high. (source: Nikkei BP)
Fig. 3: The concrete foundations were efficiently made using metal molds. The size was expanded to boost load resistance in the outer rows, where wind pressure is high. (source: Nikkei BP)

Fig. 4: A maintenance road was set up in the middle for operational efficiency. (source: Nikkei BP)
Fig. 4: A maintenance road was set up in the middle for operational efficiency. (source: Nikkei BP)

Fig. 5: This space is being kept without solar panels to prevent a building that might be built next to the plant on the west side from shading the solar panels in the afternoon. (source: Nikkei BP)
Fig. 5: This space is being kept without solar panels to prevent a building that might be built next to the plant on the west side from shading the solar panels in the afternoon. (source: Nikkei BP)

Fig. 6: In accordance with the land slightly sloping toward the drainage area in the plant, the height of the solar panels was varied by row. (source: Nikkei BP)
Fig. 6: In accordance with the land slightly sloping toward the drainage area in the plant, the height of the solar panels was varied by row. (source: Nikkei BP)

Fig. 7: The cable rack was raised as high as the foundations as a measure against flooding. (source: Nikkei BP)
Fig. 7: The cable rack was raised as high as the foundations as a measure against flooding. (source: Nikkei BP)

Fig. 8: A pipe-based mounting system adopted for verification (source: Nikkei BP)
Fig. 8: A pipe-based mounting system adopted for verification (source: Nikkei BP)

Facility overview
Facility overview

By forming each array with 84 solar panels and keeping the number of foundations small at 16 per array, the plant boosted efficiency during the installation process, from foundations to panels, and shortened the real construction period to six months.

Other schemes were as follows. Considering the efficiency in construction and operation, a maintenance road was set up (Fig. 4). In anticipation of shade from a building that might be constructed in the adjoining idle land to the west, which is owned by another company, space with no solar panels was secured (Fig. 5). Other schemes include the installation of solar panels that take advantage of the slopes in the site (Fig. 6) and the laying of wire racks at a certain height in view of flooding by typhoons, etc. (Fig. 7).

The Shimizu Group is planning to expand both EPC services and power generation business from now on.

"We came to understand the solar power generation business as a power producer by launching our own power plant," said Tsuneo Kobayashi, deputy general manager of Engineering Headquarters at Shimizu and president of Ako Taiyoko Hatsuden. "We will reflect this experience on our future EPC services."

With such an aim in mind, Ako Solar Power Plant proactively introduced new technologies and proprietary schemes while adopting different mounting systems and solar panels and verifying their strength, salt resistance and power generation situation in addition to the mega-solar power plant (Fig. 8).