[3DS LL Teardown (2)] Taking Out Main Board

Jul 31, 2012
Nikkei Electronics Teardown Squad
The three flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) found near the hinge are connected to the main board. The main board was taken out after removing them.
The three flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) found near the hinge are connected to the main board. The main board was taken out after removing them.
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The coaxial cable connected to the wireless LAN module prevented us from taking out the main board completely.
The coaxial cable connected to the wireless LAN module prevented us from taking out the main board completely.
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The wireless LAN module being detached from the main board
The wireless LAN module being detached from the main board
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The back side of the main board. In the lower right of the picture, there is a chip that looks like a power supply chip.
The back side of the main board. In the lower right of the picture, there is a chip that looks like a power supply chip.
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Continued from [3DS LL Teardown (1)] Opening Lower Case of Console

We found a main board in the lower case of the 3DS LL. To examine it, we tried to take it out from the case. The main board was fixed with 10 green screws, which we thought were too many. But it was fixed firmly probably because the console is roughly treated by children. After removing the 10 screws and flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) connected to the main board, we set out to remove the main board from the case.

However, we could not completely take out the main board because a coaxial cable connected to the wireless LAN module was in the way. So, we detached the module, which was connected via a board-to-board connector, from the main board. And we removed the coaxial cable, too.

There were few components on the back side of the main board (the side that faces up when the console is in use). The layout of the back side was almost the same as that of the back side of the 3DS' main board.

On the back side of the main board, we found a semiconductor chip printed with "93045A4" and some passive components around the chip. On the reverse side of the part on which the chip was mounted, there were an SD memory card slot and a connector for the lithium-ion (Li-ion) rechargeable battery. So, the semiconductor chip was probably a power supply chip. The location of the chip was almost the same as that of the 3DS' power supply chip.

As we expected, there was no main CPU on either side of the main board. Thinking that the main CPU was located under the slot for game software as in the case of the 3DS, we started to take out the slot.

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