Hitachi to Release Residential PV Generation System

Jul 2, 2012
Mami Akasaka, Tech-On!

Hitachi Appliances Inc will begin to sell a residential photovoltaic (PV) power generation system consisting of its power conditioner, base and fittings and other company's PV power module under the Hitachi brand Aug 20, 2012.

Hitachi Appliances will deal with three types of modules. Two of them are CIS-based PV battery modules manufactured by Solar Frontier K.K., and the other one is a monocrystalline silicon-based PV battery module manufactured by Suntech Power Japan Corp. It is possible to choose a module according to installation site, roof size and shape, etc.

The CIS-based PV battery modules are the "SFL95-C," whose effective cell conversion efficiency is 14.3% and nominal maximum output power is 95W, and the "SF155-S" with a conversion efficiency of 14.7% and an output power of 155W. The monocrystalline silicon-based PV battery module, "STP195S-24/Adb+," has a conversion efficiency of 17.4% and an output of 195W.

The prices of the SFL95-C, SF155-S and STP195S-24/Adb+ are ¥53,340 (approx US$668), ¥94,400 and ¥122,850, respectively.

For the installation of a module, Hitachi Appliances will use its own construction technique, which uses fittings and a base with rails, to reduce workload and improve external appearance. The warranty periods of the system devices (excluding the display unit) and a module are 10 and 20 years, respectively, under the condition that the PV generation system is installed by a business operator certified by Hitachi and periodically checked.

Two kinds of power conditioners can be combined with the system. Their rated capacities are 4.0kW and 5.5kW. Hitachi Appliances used its own inverter technologies such as for lowering losses associated with electric components and circuits. As a result, both of them have a conversion efficiency of 96%. Also, the company employed the "HI-MPPT (maximum power point tracking)," which operates the PV generation system by seeking for an appropriate timing for the peak of power consumption in response to changes in sunlight.