[CES] Qualcomm Reveals Wireless Power Transmission System for EVs

Jan 15, 2012
Shinya Saeki, Nikkei Electronics
The wireless power transmission system exhibited by Qualcomm
The wireless power transmission system exhibited by Qualcomm
[Click to enlarge image]
The overview of the system
The overview of the system
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The power source, power-transmitting pad and power-receiving pad
The power source, power-transmitting pad and power-receiving pad
[Click to enlarge image]
The control unit
The control unit
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A prototyped power-receiving pad and a pad for smartphone for comparison
A prototyped power-receiving pad and a pad for smartphone for comparison
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Though the weight of the prototype was not disclosed, I could hold it with one hand.
Though the weight of the prototype was not disclosed, I could hold it with one hand.
[Click to enlarge image]

Qualcomm Inc exhibited its wireless power transmission system for electric vehicles (EVs) at the 2012 International CES.

This is the first time that Qualcomm has showed the system at a trade show, it said. The system consists of a power source, power-transmitting pad, power-receiving pad, control unit, etc. It is the same system that will be used in the field test that the company plans to conduct by using 50 EVs in early 2012 in London, the UK.

Qualcomm employed a wireless power transmission technology called "Inductive Power Transfer (IPT)," which is based on the electromagnetic induction method. The technology was developed by HaloIPT, a spin-off from the University of Auckland in New Zealand, which Qualcomm purchased in November 2011.

The frequency range used for power transmission is 20k-140kHz. And the power to be transmitted is 3kW for single phase, 7kW for three phases and 18kW or higher in the case of rapid charging. The distance between the power-transmitting and power-receiving pads can be changed by up to 400mm.

This time, Qualcomm exhibited another power-receiving pad that is currently under development. Though the company did not disclose the specifications of the pad, it said that the new pad is smaller and lighter than the pad to be used in the field test.