[PS Vita Teardown (7)] OLED Panel Removed With 2 Screwdrivers

Dec 19, 2011
Nikkei Electronics Teardown Squad
The OLED panel module was stored in the front half of the PS Vita's case.
The OLED panel module was stored in the front half of the PS Vita's case.
[Click to enlarge image]
There was a small gap near the bezel of the display.
There was a small gap near the bezel of the display.
[Click to enlarge image]
Two screwdrivers were used at the same time.
Two screwdrivers were used at the same time.
[Click to enlarge image]
The OLED panel module being removed from the case
The OLED panel module being removed from the case
[Click to enlarge image]
The flexible printed circuit (FPC) board was printed with the characters "Samsung" and "SMD." The black chip seen in the lower left is Atmel's "MXT224."
The flexible printed circuit (FPC) board was printed with the characters "Samsung" and "SMD." The black chip seen in the lower left is Atmel's "MXT224."
[Click to enlarge image]
Multilayer ceramic capacitors were mounted on the FPC board.
Multilayer ceramic capacitors were mounted on the FPC board.
[Click to enlarge image]
The touch panel and the OLED panel were separated.
The touch panel and the OLED panel were separated.
[Click to enlarge image]
The main components of the PS Vita
The main components of the PS Vita
[Click to enlarge image]

Continued from [PS Vita Teardown (6)] Checking Backside Touch Sensor

We went on to tear down the display of the PS Vita. It seemed that the OLED panel was attached to the front half of the case and difficult to be taken out.

We thought that the quickest way to remove it was to insert a flat-blade screwdriver into a small gap. So, we tried it and started to slowly take out the OLED panel module from the case.

However, we fount it difficult to remove it because it was strongly attached to the case. Being afraid of cracking the panel, we asked an engineer to do the job. But he also found it difficult.

Probably, we could smoothly remove the module by heating it to reduce the adhesive force. In fact, we removed the LCD panel module of the iPad 2 by using an iron to heat it (See related article). But the front half of the case was made of plastic. If it had been heated too much, it would have been deformed or melted. So, we gave up the idea of using an iron. We could apply it to the iPad 2 because its front cover was made of glass.

When we were thinking over the idea, an engineer inserted the flat-blade screwdriver into a gap near the bezel of the display. While keeping widening the gap with the screwdriver, he used another flat-blade screwdriver to remove the OLED panel module, like a two-sword fighter.

This method worked well. Though the front half of the case and the OLED panel were cracked, we successfully removed the component containing the OLED panel from the case.

The flexible printed circuit (FPC) board connected to the panel module was printed with the characters "Samsung" and "SMD." As we expected, the OLED panel seemed to be manufactured by Samsung Mobile Display (SMD) Co Ltd.

Next, we took out two metal shields from the FPC board. One of the shields was equipped with many multilayer ceramic capacitors while the other shield was mounted with a controller chip for the capacitive touch sensor. The chip was the same as the one used for the backside touch sensor (Atmel Corp's "MXT224").

Then, we started to disassemble the OLED panel module. We separated the touch panel and the OLED panel, which were attached to each other with a strong adhesive, by making full use of the flat-blade screwdriver.

Though we had a feeling of accomplishment, we could not analyze the OLED panel on the spot. We needed some help from our colleagues and engineers who know well about display technologies. So, we wrapped up the teardown.