[Kinect Teardown (2)] Struggling With Double-faced Tape

Nov 26, 2010
Nikkei Electronics Teardown Squad
The back of the main body. A microphone seems to be located below the porous part. In this picture, the front side of the Kinect is facing up. So, this is a picture of the right below part of the chassis. There is a similar porous part on the left below part.
The back of the main body. A microphone seems to be located below the porous part. In this picture, the front side of the Kinect is facing up. So, this is a picture of the right below part of the chassis. There is a similar porous part on the left below part.
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The distorted porous part
The distorted porous part
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The chassis without the porous part. A double-faced tape remains on it.
The chassis without the porous part. A double-faced tape remains on it.
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After the tape was completely removed, screws and holes leading to the microphone were found.
After the tape was completely removed, screws and holes leading to the microphone were found.
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Continued from [Kinect Teardown (1)] Breaking Down Kinect's Stand

We began to break down the main body of the Kinect motion controller. To open the chassis, we looked for screws. First, we searched a porous area where a microphone seemed to be embedded. It was located on the back of the main body. Human voices seemed to pass through this porous area and reach the microphone.

When closely looked at, the porous part was seemingly detachable. An engineer inserted a flat-blade screwdriver into a gap around the part and tried to pry it open.

"Hmm ... It doesn't open," he said. "It's so clingy."

When he applied more strength to the screwdriver, the porous part began to come away from the main chassis while making a creaking sound. Because the porous part was attached to the lower chassis with a double-faced tape having a strong adhesive property, the part became distorted.

"Though the tape is very thin, its adhesive force is strong," an engineer said. "It might be a specially prepared tape."

After removing the porous part, we carefully removed the remaining double-faced tape. Then, we found several screws under the tape. And as we expected, there were holes that lead to the microphone. The double-faced tape covered almost the entire area under the porous part except for the holes leading to the microphone.

We removed the screws and tried to open the chassis, but it did not open. Considering that there were more screws under the sticker located on the back of the chassis and printed with "Xbox360," we peeled off the sticker.

"There they are," said engineers removing the screws. And we were ready to open the chassis.

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