Hibino Develops Large-size LED Display

Nov 25, 2010
Satoshi Okubo, Nikkei Electronics
The 76-inch 3D LED display with a pixel pitch of 4mm
The 76-inch 3D LED display with a pixel pitch of 4mm
[Click to enlarge image]
The 280-inch 3D LED display with a pixel pitch of 6mm
The 280-inch 3D LED display with a pixel pitch of 6mm
[Click to enlarge image]
The dot-by-dot method
The dot-by-dot method
[Click to enlarge image]
The screen of the 76-inch display. The light-emitting points become dots.
The screen of the 76-inch display. The light-emitting points become dots.
[Click to enlarge image]

Hibino Corp developed a 3D LED display, which comes in two models. One is the "ChromaLED 3D4," an LED display whose pixels (LEDs) are arrayed with the industry's narrowest pitch of 4mm. The other is the "ChromaLED 3D6," whose pixel pitch is 6mm.

Both of the models are based on the "dot-by-dot method," which alternately arranges video signals for the right eye and the left eye on each dot. Each dot is equipped with a circularly-polarized filter, and 3D images can be viewed by using passive circularly-polarized glasses.

Hibino expects that the new LED display will be used for exhibitions, concerts and other events as well as for museums, attractions at theme parks and so forth.

Thus far, Hibino has been developing 3D LED displays based on the "line-by-line method," which alternately arranges video signals for the right eye and the left eye on each horizontal line. But the method has a problem that the resolution of 3D images in the vertical direction decreases by half compared with that of 2D images. As a result, the clarity of images lowers, making it impossible, for example, to clearly display diagonal lines.

This time, Hibino employed the dot-by-dot method to mitigate such a problem. Though the resolutions in the horizontal and vertical directions decrease by about 30% in the dot-by-dot method, it maintains the balance of the resolutions at a constant level, enabling to display natural 3D images. Also, the company developed its own method of placing a circularly-polarized filter on each dot so that the viewing angle of the display increases.