NTT Docomo's New Handsets Capable of Shooting Full-HD Video

May 19, 2010
Tomohisa Takei, Nikkei Electronics
The "SH-07B" has an HDMI port.
The "SH-07B" has an HDMI port.
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The "F-06B" is equipped with a 13.2-Mpixel CMOS camera module.
The "F-06B" is equipped with a 13.2-Mpixel CMOS camera module.
[ If it clicks, the expanded picture will open ]
The N-04B supports the DLNA and can play contents via a home LAN.
The N-04B supports the DLNA and can play contents via a home LAN.
[ If it clicks, the expanded picture will open ]

NTT Docomo Inc announced two types of mobile phones that can shoot full-HD (1,920 x 1,080-pixel) video May 18, 2010, in Japan.

They are the "F-06B" (Fujitsu Ltd) and the "SH-07B" (Sharp Corp), which NTT Docomo claims are the world's first mobile phones capable of shooting full HD video.

"We employed the SH-Mobile G4 for the F-06B and the SH-07B," NTT Docomo said.

The SH-Mobile G4 is the fourth-generation product of the SH-Mobile G SoC (system-on-chip), which integrates digital baseband processing and application processing functions (See related article). And the SH-Mobile G4 enabled the F-06B and the SH-07B to encode and record video with a resolution of 1,920 x 1,080 pixels and at a frame rate of 24fps.

The SH-07B has an HDMI port for video output. When the SH-07B is connected to a TV by using a separately sold HDMI cable, recorded video can be output to a large-screen display.

On the other hand, the F-06B does not support any interface for video output. To display recorded image on a large screen display, a memory card, etc have to be used to transfer a video file.

Furthermore, NTT Docomo announced the N-04B, a mobile phone capable of recording HDTV video with a resolution of 1,280 x 720 pixels at a frame rate of 30fps. Equipped with a wireless LAN communication function, it supports the DLNA (Digital Living Network Alliance), a design guideline for sharing contents via a home network. Video and still images recorded on the N-04B can be played on a DLNA device connected to a home LAN.