[Vaio X Teardown (3)] Impressive Efforts to Reduce Thickness

Nov 13, 2009
Nikkei Electronics Teardown Squad
A metal bar is attached to the battery pack, probably to enhance the robustness.
A metal bar is attached to the battery pack, probably to enhance the robustness.
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The film used to cover the touch pad is formed by vacuum molding.
The film used to cover the touch pad is formed by vacuum molding.
[ If it clicks, the expanded picture will open ]
A sticker covers a hole that seems to be used for injection molding.
A sticker covers a hole that seems to be used for injection molding.
[ If it clicks, the expanded picture will open ]

Finally, we started to tear down the Vaio X with help from engineers.

"What is this metal bar?" said an engineer who was looking at the battery pack. The bar does not seem to be used for electric connection.

"Probably, Sony added this bar to reinforce the battery pack that can be replaced by users and whose weight is concentrated on the right and left sides," he said.

The touch pad is covered with what looks like a thin plastic film.

"This is called vacuum forming," an engineer said. "A heated film is pulled into a mold using vacuum suction. This is very well done. We have to follow this example."

We removed all of the screws that we found on the back of the notebook PC but had a feeling that some parts were still fixed with screws. There were two stickers attached to the back of the PC.

"Probably, there are some screws under these stickers," an engineer said. "The PC contains a 3G module. So, I think they are used to seal in the module."

When we peeled off one sticker, we could not find any screws.

"This is a hole used for resin injection molding with a metal mold," an engineer said. "It's impressive that they used a sticker just to cover the hole."

Under the other sticker, there were screws. After they had been removed, the parts were fixed only by plastic claws.

When the back cover was taken off, we found circuit boards covered with a transparent insulation sheet. The insulation sheet is necessary probably because the back cover contains carbon. We did not find many noise-reduction components scattered on the circuit boards.

"The components are neatly positioned," an engineer said. "They have good taste. I don't know whether it is because of their high technical capabilities or efforts in designing the PC. But I think they succeeded in streamlining it."

Though we did not measure the thickness of the back cover, it is allegedly about 0.8mm.

"It's awesome," an engineer said. "They must have been desperate to reduce the thickness of the PC."