[Vaio X Teardown (2)] A Little Slow in Launching Apps

Nov 11, 2009
Nikkei Electronics Teardown Squad
The Vaio X might be thinner than a ringed notebook.
The Vaio X might be thinner than a ringed notebook.
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The battery pack of the Vaio X (L battery)
The battery pack of the Vaio X (L battery)
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The battery pack was removed.
The battery pack was removed.
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At first, it did not boot up without the AC adapter.
At first, it did not boot up without the AC adapter.
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We could feel the slimness of the Vaio X when holding it in our hands. It is thinner than we imagined when we saw the Vaio X at CEATEC 2009. It might be difficult to find when in a stack of papers.

We did not feel any heaviness partly because it has enough width. For example, the weight of Sony Corp's "VGN-UX71" is about 532g, which is lighter than the 768g of the Vaio X. But, because the width of the VGN-UX71 is shorter, we felt that the two PCs weighed about the same.

Before turning on the PC, we removed its battery. The Vaio X is equipped with lithium-polymer batteries, which are located below the right and left palm rests as if sandwiching a touch pad. If normal round lithium-ion batteries were used, they could not be positioned in the same way.

Then, we set the battery but could not turn on the PC. We thought the battery was not charged and used the AC adapter. According to the manuals, the AC adapter has to be used to boot the PC for the first time.

The operating system (OS) began to be initialized, and the configuration of user account and network settings started. Those operations are not very much different from those of Windows XP and Windows Vista.

After the configuration was finished, we ran some programs. We started with Internet Explorer, which is preinstalled. It took some time to launch the browser. But, once it was launched, it operated smoothly.

Next, we watched some YouTube videos to check the video processing capability of the Vaio X. We used "Task Manager," a preinstalled application, to check the CPU usage rate. It was almost 100% right after we started watching a movie, but it settled at about 55% after a while, meaning that the CPU had some extra power. When we played a movie with Windows Media Player in the same way, the CPU usage rate was from 40 to 70%.

Furthermore, we installed the Japanese input method editor "Atok 2009," the Japanese text editor "Hidemaru" and the Web browser "Chrome," and they all operated smoothly. However, when we were switching tasks, for example, to check the status of wireless LAN communication, we felt some lags. It is not that the PC is always slow, but we sometimes felt that the performance is poor.

For example, when the Vaio X is used to edit movies, it does not have enough performance. But the notebook PC is mainly targeted at business users who carry around their laptops. In this sense, Sony made a notebook PC that is suited for its copy, "We need no extras, we need sufficiency."