[New PS3 Teardown (4)] Internal Structure Becomes Much Simpler

Sep 8, 2009
Nikkei Electronics Teardown Squad
The new PS3 has Hitachi Global Storage Technologies Inc's HDD.
The new PS3 has Hitachi Global Storage Technologies Inc's HDD.
[Click to enlarge image]
The lower left part is a cooling system composed of a fan, heatsink and duct. A power supply module is seen in the back. The right part is a Blu-ray Disc device.
The lower left part is a cooling system composed of a fan, heatsink and duct. A power supply module is seen in the back. The right part is a Blu-ray Disc device.
[Click to enlarge image]
The meandering cable is connected to metal parts.
The meandering cable is connected to metal parts.
[Click to enlarge image]

Continued from [New PS3 Teardown (3)] Power Consumption Further Reduced

We finally started to tear down the new PS3 (model number: CECH-2000A) with help from some engineers. First, we removed its hard disk drive (HDD), which turned out to be a product of Hitachi Global Storage Technologies Inc (HGST).

Next, we took off screws on the top and bottom surfaces of the PS3. We could not find a transparent, shiny cover, which is used for the former PS3 models. Sony probably did not use the cover this time to lower the cost.

"This is much simpler than its predecessors," said an engineer when he looked at the inside after removing the upper chassis.

In fact, a cooling system, Blu-ray Disc device and power-supply module were neatly arranged. In the former models, a cooling module is placed on the bottom of the chassis, and a main board is mounted on it. A Blu-ray Disc device, power-supply module and other parts are placed on the main board.

In the new PS3, however, the Blu-ray Disc device, cooling system and power supply module could be placed side by side due to its smaller cooling module. The main board is probably located under those three parts. We believe this design contributed to reducing the thickness of the game console and the number of assembling processes.

In the neatly arranged internal structure, a thin cable coming from under the power supply module drew our attention. The cable passes between the cooling system and the Blu-ray Disc device and is connected to odd-shaped metal parts.

"They look like antennas," an engineer said.

In contrast to the arrangement of other parts, it seemed that the metal parts were crammed into a small space.

We continued the disassembly by starting to remove the cooling module, Blu-ray Disc device and power supply module to check the main board.

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