[Ultra-small Projectors Teardown] Large Radiator Fin in LCOS Projector [Part 3]

Dec 30, 2008
Nikkei Electronics Teardown Squad
Fig 1: The MPro110's Li-ion secondary battery. The voltage is 3.7V, and the capacity is 1,050mAh.
Fig 1: The MPro110's Li-ion secondary battery. The voltage is 3.7V, and the capacity is 1,050mAh.
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Fig 2: The MPro110 with the top cover removed. The radiation fin is seen in the upper left of the photo. The large LSI on the main board is the "HX6271-A" LCOS driver LSI manufactured by Himax Technologies of Taiwan.
Fig 2: The MPro110 with the top cover removed. The radiation fin is seen in the upper left of the photo. The large LSI on the main board is the "HX6271-A" LCOS driver LSI manufactured by Himax Technologies of Taiwan.
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Fig 3: The external surface of the metal chassis is corrugated to expand the surface area.
Fig 3: The external surface of the metal chassis is corrugated to expand the surface area.
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Fig 4: The gold parts are the battery connector pins. The pins are exposed.
Fig 4: The gold parts are the battery connector pins. The pins are exposed.
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Following the "PK101," which uses DMD (digital micromirror device) as a display element, we started breaking down the "MPro110" equipped with an LCOS (liquid crystal on silicon) display (See related article).

As in the case of the PK101, we removed the Li-ion secondary battery from the chassis and unscrewed the screws to open the chassis. Neither the name nor the logo of a manufacturer was printed on the battery (Fig 1). An engineer from a component manufacturer who is well-versed in secondary batteries guessed the manufacturer from the battery's shape and capacity and said, "This is probably a product of a Japanese manufacturer, I guess."

The inside of the chassis, which consists of an optical module and the main board, looked almost the same as the PK101's inside (Fig 2). The optical module includes an LCOS display, an LED light source and optical components. The main board is mounted with an LCOS driver LSI and various electronic components.

Among the components located inside the chassis, the radiation fin stood out the most because it is rather big for the chassis, which is as small as a portable music player. It seems to be an effort to efficiently radiate heat generated from the white LEDs in the light source.

Moreover, there are vent holes on the chassis near the fin. This is something that the PK101 did not have. Expanding the surface area by corrugating the external surface of the metal chassis like a radiation fin, 3M appears to have paid more attention to measures to deal with heat than Optoma (Fig 3).

On the main substrate, the connector pins for the Li-ion secondary battery are unusual (Fig 4). Commenting on the completely exposed pins, an engineer from a component manufacturer said, "I've never seen anything like this."

Generally speaking, connector pins are integrated with plastic components in mobile phones. An engineer said that the exposed pins are probably the result of the company's efforts to cut costs.

We moved on to disassemble the optical module.