'Mobile Phones Will Shoot Full HD Video in 2012,' Ericsson Says

Nov 7, 2008
Hiroki Yomogita, Nikkei Electronics
Mobile device in 2012
Mobile device in 2012
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Technical shift from HSPA to LTE
Technical shift from HSPA to LTE
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HSPA networks are increasing all over the world.
HSPA networks are increasing all over the world.
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HSPA-compatible devices have increased to 805 items
HSPA-compatible devices have increased to 805 items
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Ericsson's HSPA module for embedded use
Ericsson's HSPA module for embedded use
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Ericsson AB of Sweden revealed its efforts in the mobile broadband market at a press conference Nov 6, 2008.

In the area of mobile communications, innovative technologies such as "HSPA evolution," which is the successor to HSPA, and "LTE (long term evolution)," which features high-speed communications of more than 100Mbps, are drawing interest. For both of these technologies, Ericsson intends to proactively develop and market embedded modules, base station facilities and other products.

During the conference, Ericsson mentioned its concept of a future mobile terminal as "a mobile device in 2012." According to the concept, high-function terminals, in the future, will be equipped with a 12- to 20-Mpixel camera and support full HD video shooting capability.

"We have an image of a mobile terminal equipped with digital camera and camcorder capabilities of the future," said Jonas Lundstedt, Ericsson's Director Portfolio Management, Product and Portfolio Management.

The terminal's display will have XGA resolution. And the operating frequency of the application processor will reach 1GHz, he said. As for its telecommunications functionality, Ericsson expects the device to support 100Mbps or faster LTE.

The company considers that the market shift toward such a future mobile terminal is gradual. Current HSPA technology has a maximum transmission speed of 7.2Mbps, and 59 commercial networks are already operating around the world (38 of which are using Ericsson's system), it said. According to Ericsson, 805 kinds of HSPA-compatible terminals have been released from 129 manufacturers thus far.

"HSPA evolution," an extended version of HSPA, will emerge in late 2008 or later, with the maximum data transmission speed expected to rise to 21Mbps.

"W-CDMA, which has a maximum speed of 384Kbps, emerged in about 2002," Lundstedt said. "The capacity of data transmission will have grown 60 times larger in the six years since then."

On the other hand, he considers that the degree of the introduction of LTE is different depending on the region. The early shift to LTE is scheduled in some regions including Japan, whereas HSPA and HSPA evolution are likely to remain the mainstream for some time to come in other regions, he said.