[Android Phone Teardown] G1 Uses Same Trackball as BlackBerry [Part 5]

Oct 30, 2008
Nikkei Electronics Teardown Squad
The sub-substrate (lower part) and the chassis with a trackball (upper part). A group of chips used for wireless LAN covers the left half of the sub-substrate. Located to the right of the chips is a Hall IC that recognizes the movement of the trackball. The rear side of the trackball is seen in the center of the black chassis. A plastic bar that connected the chassis unit with the display unit was located in the right part of the chassis.
The sub-substrate (lower part) and the chassis with a trackball (upper part). A group of chips used for wireless LAN covers the left half of the sub-substrate. Located to the right of the chips is a Hall IC that recognizes the movement of the trackball. The rear side of the trackball is seen in the center of the black chassis. A plastic bar that connected the chassis unit with the display unit was located in the right part of the chassis.
[Click to enlarge image]

Continued from [Android Phone Teardown] 2nd Vibration Motor Found [Part 4].

After examining the display unit, there remained only a black chassis mounted with a substrate that receives inputs from a trackball and various buttons, a sub-substrate and other parts.

This part was integrated with the keyboard unit and connected to the display unit by a relatively thin plastic bar.

"Some users might break this bar by accident and make the display unit fall off," said the engineer who participated in the disassembly.

The sub-substrate is not of the same kind as the main substrate. And the letter "M," which is printed on the main substrate, was not found on the sub-substrate (See related article).

When the sub-substrate was removed, a group of chips, probably used for wireless LAN, appeared. And, next to those chips, there was a Hall IC that detects the roll of the trackball and clicks.

"The structures of the trackball module and the Hall IC look almost the same as used in the BlackBerry Bold of Research In Motion Ltd (RIM)," the engineer said.

On the back of the sub-substrate, microSD and mini-USB sockets and an IC (probably for a Bluetooth function) were mounted.

Android Phone Teardown in Video (Japanese)