[CES] Sony Develops Ultrahigh-Speed Close Proximity Wireless Transfer Technology

Jan 8, 2008
Tetsuo Nozawa, Nikkei Electronics
Data transmission is initiated just by "placing" a camcorder on a dedicated receiver.
Data transmission is initiated just by "placing" a camcorder on a dedicated receiver.
[Click to enlarge image]
Sony's VAIO equipped with the receiver was also demonstrated. Data transmission was initiated when a camcorder was placed on the main body.
Sony's VAIO equipped with the receiver was also demonstrated. Data transmission was initiated when a camcorder was placed on the main body.
[Click to enlarge image]
Antennas are located on the bottom face of the camcorder and at the positions of the chassis screws, etc.
Antennas are located on the bottom face of the camcorder and at the positions of the chassis screws, etc.
[Click to enlarge image]

Sony Corp announced Jan 7, 2008, that it developed a new close proximity wireless transfer technology called TransferJet.

The TransferJet technology features an extremely high data transfer rate of up to 560Mbps. Sony is exhibiting the technology as a reference presentation at the 2008 International CES, a consumer electronics trade show taking place in Las Vegas from Jan 7 to 10, 2008.

Although its communication distance is only up to 3cm, the TransferJet technology enables an ultrahigh speed transmission. It features a physical layer transmission rate of 560Mbps. And even allowing for error corrections, it provides an effective data transmission rate of 375Mbps.

Because TransferJet utilizes the induction field as the transmission medium instead of using the electric wave, the company reportedly developed a new coupler for use with this technology. The coupler uses the frequency band at 4.48GHz. The TransferJet technology is capable of sending data at a transmission power of -70dBm/MHz or less, which is compliant with low intensity radio wave regulations in Japan.

The new technology can be utilized in a similar manner to that of the FeliCa contactless IC card.

"Data communications can be performed just by holding the device directly over its counterpart," Sony said.

The technology can avoid interference with other devices located nearby because the intensity of induction field is sharply attenuated over longer distances unlike the case of the electric wave. It also eliminates the complex system because it requires no access point in contrast to the wireless LAN.

Sony plans to promote the TransferJet technology as a method to transmit large-volume data such as pictures and video to handsets, for example, mobile phones, digital cameras and camcorders.

"We will encourage the industry at large to adopt this technology," the company said.

2008 International CES Special Site