[Breaking Down Wooo UT] Mysterious Cream-colored Sheet [Part 3]

Dec 19, 2007
Nikkei Electronics Breakdown Team
Compared with other Wooo series, the TV was designed to look simpler.
Compared with other Wooo series, the TV was designed to look simpler.
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The mysterious sheet covering the unit thought to be the power board
The mysterious sheet covering the unit thought to be the power board
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We tried to burn part of the sheet. It appeared to be flame resistant.
We tried to burn part of the sheet. It appeared to be flame resistant.
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The Nikkei Electronics Breakdown Team removed the chassis at the back side of the display part. There appeared various kinds of circuit boards attached orderly at the back face of the LCD panel module.

"We have taken apart Hitachi LCD TVs several times," said one of the engineers who attended the disassembly. "With the chassis removed, this TV looks so lean that it isn't like the typical Hitachi product that we disassembled before. Hitachi TVs are famous for their 'heavy duty construction.' It must have been quite a venture for Hitachi."

This is one of the reasons why another engineer couldn't help but exclaim that it was so simple in the previous article.

At last, we started to analyze the boards that appeared in front of us. At that moment, the engineer suddenly stopped.

"I've never seen something like this before," he murmured.

What he was looking at was a component covering a unit that seemed like an ultrathin power board, the key technology that realized this TV. The cream-colored component covered the entire part of the unit that was believed to be the power board.

It was not made of plastic. It looked like paper or a special fibrous material, but we were uncertain about it as there was no indication of what it was made from.

"It might be an insulation sheet," the engineer said. "But I have never seen a sheet that color and made from that kind of material. I have no idea what Hitachi is using it for."

"I've never seen anything like it before, either," said an engineer from another company, who was also at a loss. "It may not be an insulating sheet because the chassis at the back side is made of plastic. It may be a component to protect the power board from dust or to shield the chassis against heat generated by the power board. ..."

We postponed the analysis of the sheet that puzzled many engineers. Getting back to our disassembly assignment, we finally started to analyze the circuit boards.

Off course, what we wanted to observe first was the ultrathin power board that had to be hidden under the mysterious sheet. We removed the sheet, holding our breath. ...