[CEATEC] NEC's Home Server Simultaneously Distributes Two HDTV Programs

Oct 5, 2007
Aya Hirano, Nikkei Personal Computing
The black box in the center is the server featuring the "Multi Record Cast" technology. HD videos were being distributed to the two PCs far left and far right at the same time.
The black box in the center is the server featuring the "Multi Record Cast" technology. HD videos were being distributed to the two PCs far left and far right at the same time.
[Click to enlarge image]

NEC Corp. has presented a home server incorporating cutting-edge technologies at "CEATEC Japan 2007" being held at Makuhari Messe in Chiba.

The server features technologies including "Multi Record Cast," which allows simultaneous recording and playback of two HDTV programs and "Remote Screen Technology," which enables remote control using PCs outside the home. NEC aims to commercialize the server in the first half of 2008.

The "Multi Record Cast" is a server technology, which distributes recorded video data to two client PCs while simultaneously recording two HD quality programs. Although the simultaneous execution of these tasks causes a heavy load, NEC realized the technology by accelerating access to hard discs through the adoption of its proprietary software and file management technology, while reducing the load on the CPU by incorporating a chip dedicated to data distribution control.

In addition, NEC internally divided the home server into one system for recording and another for the playback and management of recorded content. In an effort to stabilize server operation, the company embedded the recording system with 24-hour monitoring capability and automatic recovery function for cases, in which malfunctions are detected, and fortified the system's durability by introducing a mechanism to record data onto two hard discs in turn.

Remote Screen Technology is a technology for both the server and client PCs that enables users to display the home server's desktop on a client PC and operate the server from outside the home. Users can access the server from client PCs outside the home using public WLAN and other LAN services, view videos and still images stored in the server and access the Internet via the home server, for example.

Transmissions between the home server and client PCs are compressed using the company's proprietary technology and exchanged via VPNs. Users will not be stressed if data rates reach around 1 Mbps when browsing text data and roughly 10 to 20 Mbps when browsing videos from client PCs, according to NEC.