JRC, SuperWave Develop Radio Transceiver with Mobile Phone Loss Prevention Function

Jul 19, 2007
Chikashi Horikiri, Nikkei Electronics
The product is slated for launch from both JRC and SuperWave under different model numbers, namely NJU35000 for JRC and SWJ1000 for SuperWave.
The product is slated for launch from both JRC and SuperWave under different model numbers, namely NJU35000 for JRC and SWJ1000 for SuperWave.
[Click to enlarge image]

New Japan Radio Co. Ltd. (JRC) and SuperWave Corp. have jointly developed the NJU35000/SWJ1000, a short-range radio transceiver IC designed for applications such as mobile phone loss prevention and security functions.

To enable these capabilities, the transceiver ICs are included in mobile phone and electronic key modules. When the mobile phone is left behind and is separated from the electronic key module, the module sounds an alarm to notify the user or locks the phone to ensure security.

Similar misplacement prevention or security function has already been employed in NTT DoCoMo, Inc.'s handsets. While those models employ radio technology based on 400 MHz bandwidth specified low power radio transmission, JRC and SuperWave have adopted 300 MHz band low power radio for the latest product.

"We've figured that the low power radio is more suited to reduce the power consumption and chip size compared to the specified low power radio," JRC said.

This is intended to prolong the battery life of radio key and to reduce the price.

The latest development is based on Ver. 1.0 of the SPC specification established by the SPC Consortium. The two companies aim to obtain approval as soon as possible once the consortium starts granting the certificate.

The SPC Consortium is a standardization organization of bidirectional authentication technique using the short-range radio technology.

The circuits integrated in NJU35000/SWJ1000 include a 300 MHz band low power radio transceiver circuit, 8-bit RISC microcontroller, 32-KB flash memory, 4-KB SRAM. The IC is housed in a 52-pin CSP measuring 4.5 x 4.5 x 0.86 mm.

The maximum communication distance of the low power radio is approximately 30 m. The consumption power at both transmission and reception is 10 mA, and the standby power consumption is 10 μA or less.

"We believe that the battery life of the radio key module can be extended to one year, although detailed evaluation will be made later," JRC said.

The IC was developed based on the 180-nm CMOS design rule. The schedule for the sample or volume shipment is yet to be decided.