Dai Nippon Printing and Sony's Hologram Reproduces 100-frame Video Images

Jul 12, 2007
Naoki Asakawa, Nikkei Electronics

Dai Nippon Printing Co. Ltd. and Sony PCL Inc. have developed a hologram that can store a video image with 100 frames.

With the new hologram, moving images such as animation and live action can be played back by changing the viewing angle. It is targeted for authentication stickers, etc. used as measures against counterfeit products. The companies have already started receiving orders.

The latest product is classified as the Lippmann hologram, which records images with interference patterns formed by irradiating two laser lights on a photopolymer.

Although the production cost of the Lippmann hologram is higher than that of the embossed hologram, which uses a die to transfer interference patterns, the Lippmann hologram has an advantage that it makes counterfeiting more difficult.

The existing Lippmann holograms can record stereogram images with high visibility but can only store two or three video images at most. The companies have employed the linear sequential recording technology developed by Sony PCL to manufacture the master substrate and succeeded in storing 100 frames of planar images instead of stereogram images.

Mass production is achieved by duplicating the interference patterns formed on the substrate to the film by using laser light. Thus, video images that smoothly change appearance as the observers change their viewing angle can be recorded.

The logo transforming from "COMPANY LOGO" to "GENUINE PRODUCT" by changing the view angle
The logo transforming from "COMPANY LOGO" to "GENUINE PRODUCT" by changing the view angle
[Click to enlarge image]
Images waiting to be recorded are displayed on a LCD panel and converted into slits with the use of a cylindrical lens so that interference patterns are recorded on a glass substrate.
Images waiting to be recorded are displayed on a LCD panel and converted into slits with the use of a cylindrical lens so that interference patterns are recorded on a glass substrate.
[Click to enlarge image]