PS3: Surprised at Huge Cooler Fan

Nov 13, 2006
Nikkei Electronics
Huge cooler fan showed under the inner cover.
Huge cooler fan showed under the inner cover.
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With the fan and its driver motor unit detached
With the fan and its driver motor unit detached
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BD drive taken out of PS3
BD drive taken out of PS3
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Main board's upper surface. Its design was unexpectedly simple.
Main board's upper surface. Its design was unexpectedly simple.
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The large package on the right is the Cell.
The large package on the right is the Cell.
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"EE+GS" chip embedded to run software titles developed for PS2
"EE+GS" chip embedded to run software titles developed for PS2
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Heat pipes combined in a complex design
Heat pipes combined in a complex design
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We removed the PS3's bottom face cover. There we found a cooler fan, which was huge beyond our imagination. Its presence could be regarded almost as an electric fan at home. This fan seems to be based on Sony's concept of most quiet heat radiation by slowly rotating this large-bore fan.

Next we removed the BD drive and the hard disc drive (HDD). The HDD embedded with the PS3 we tore down this time was a product by Seagate Technology LLC. It was marked with a model number "Momentus 5400.2.".

Under the cooler unit combining heat liberation boards like radiators and many heat pipes, the main board showed up at last. The number of components mounted on the board was surprisingly small. Most distinguished were the Cell, RSX graphics LSI and "EE + GS" embedded to secure compatibility with the PS2. Few components were mounted on the back of this board. NEC TOKIN Corp.'s Proadlizers located around the Cell and RSX might be the only recognizable chips on the back.