PS3: Let's Tear It Down

Nov 13, 2006
Nikkei Electronics
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Screw holding the dressing cover
Screw holding the dressing cover
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We took off another cover on the chassis under the dressing cover.
We took off another cover on the chassis under the dressing cover.
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Showed up a BD drive, a power supply unit . . .
Showed up a BD drive, a power supply unit . . .
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We took off the power supply unit at first.
We took off the power supply unit at first.
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The power supply unit's output port, from which power is sent to the main board
The power supply unit's output port, from which power is sent to the main board
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Extra-thick power supply pins on the main board
Extra-thick power supply pins on the main board
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The board integrating wireless communication circuits
The board integrating wireless communication circuits
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Now, we start tearing down the PlayStation 3 (PS3). The shiny upper cover should be removed first. To do this, we needed to remove a hidden screw on a side of the body. Taking off the sticker hiding the screw and sticking a special driver, which is a kind that has a hole in the center of a TORX screw, we succeeded in feeling for and unscrewing the hidden screw.

The shiny cover looked black at first, but we found it actually formed with half-transparent plastic as we took it off the chassis. This is a sort of dressing covers. Under this dressing cover was another cover. We could remove this cover by removing seven screws using a Phillips driver. Then the BD driver and power supply unit came upon surface.

Despite the maximum power of 380 W, the power supply unit only took a small area a little larger than a palm. It was connected with the main board via very fat pins, which looked about 5 mm in diameter, respectively. On the back of the unit were stamped "DC OUTPUT +12-32A, +5-3A." This unit was made in China.

Then we removed the memory card slot, which is packed into a module, and a board, which mounts wireless LAN, Bluetooth and other wireless communication LSIs. The WLAN chip was connected with a diversity antenna.